Image
Ike's Soldiers banner image

Search

Filter Your Results

Ike's Soldiers: A Virtual World War II Honor Roll
Stories from the Greatest Generation

empty

empty e. empty empty

empty

EMPTY
E.
EMPTY
EMPTY

Jan 1, 2000 - Jan 1, 2000
BIRTHPLACE: empty

SOLDIER DETAILS

HIGHEST RANK: empty
DIVISION: empty,
empty
THEATER OF OPERATION: empty
SERVED: Jan 1, 2000 -
DISCHARGED: Jan 1, 2000
BATTLE: empty
MILITARY HONORS: empty
HONORED BY: empty

VIDEOS

empty

BIOGRAPHY

empty
empty

Search Results

Showing Results 89 - 96 of 952

Richard E. Boyer
Army
Richard
E.
Boyer
DIVISION: Army
Mar 3, 2015 - Aug 22, 1976
BIRTHPLACE: Sedwick, CO
THEATER OF OPERATION: European
SERVED: Mar 10, 1943 -
0
Jan 31, 1970
0
HONORED BY: The children of Lt. Col. Richard E. Boyer

BIOGRAPHY

Richard E. Boyer was in the Normandy, Northern France, Germany and Rhineland theater campaigns. He earned the following medals and awards: Bronze Star, Purple Heart, Army Commendation Medal, Good Conduct Medal, Belgian Fourragere, Presidential Unit Citation, Meritorious Unit Commendation, American Defense Service Medal, European-African Middle Eastern Campaign Medal, WW II Victory Medal and Combat Infantryman Badge, 1st Award. He was, in fact, wounded in Belgium. A young girl from the Belgium freedom fighters took my dad into hiding, saving him from the Germans. He continued his career in the U.S. Army and was stationed in Korea and Vietnam. He retired in 1970 and died in 1976 from cancer.

Harry T. Boyle
Army
Harry
T.
Boyle
DIVISION: Army,
96th Division,383rd, 'L' Company
Jul 26, 1926 - Feb 14, 2005
BIRTHPLACE: Oakland, CA
THEATER OF OPERATION: Pacific
SERVED: Aug 24, 1944 -
0
Aug 26, 1947
0
HONORED BY: His Family and Friends

BIOGRAPHY

Determined to serve alongside his brothers, Harry Thomas Boyle enlisted in the Army on August 24, 1944. With three sons already serving overseas, his decision greatly upset his parents. Completing basic training at Fort Ord, California, he sent a recorded message home reassuring them, 'It is going to be a long time until you hear my voice... I can't tell you where I am, but... I know where I'm going and the job I have to do. You don't have to worry about me. All I want you to do is save my old place at the table at Christmas.'

Assigned to the 96th Division, he shipped out with other replacement troops from Seattle, Washington. In open water his transport ship encountered large convoys. Amidst an ever-growing armada came the realization that an enormous invasion was being prepared -- possibly the island of Japan itself. He recalled that soldiers were not as much concerned with whether they'd die -- but when. 'Nobody wanted to be the last man killed in war.'

Attached to the 383rd, L Co he engaged the enemy within days of landing on the island of Okinawa. His ultimate baptism under fire came on April 9, 1945, when he and the men he served with fought in the Battle of Kakazu Ridge. In this heroic struggle for survival, he received his combat infantry badge along with an unwavering devotion for his commanding officer, Lt. Willard 'Hoss' Mitchell. He often spoke of Mitchell in the highest terms. 'They should have put him in charge' he'd say, 'He would have ended the war a hell of a lot sooner!'

He was severely wound on the Medeera Escarpments on June 6th, 1945 -- just 15-days prior to the end of the war. After reaching the top of the escarpment, he and a fellow soldier named Casey met machine gun and mortar fire. Casey was instantly killed. Mortally wounded, our father fell off the escarpment's edge. Landing on a ledge, the battle raged around him as he fell in and out of consciousness. Later in the night he received secondary injuries from the shrapnel of an exploding grenade. Near death, he was found the following morning after American forces secured the ridge.

On August 26, 1947, our father returned home from war. For service to his county, Sergeant Harry Thomas Boyle was awarded the Combat Infantry Badge, Bronze Star (BMS), Purple Heart, Asiatic/Pacific Service Medal, World War II Victory Medal and Good Conduct Medal. In a retail career lasting 32-years, he worked his way up the corporate ladder from Warehouseman to District Supervisor of Sales for Payless Drug stores. He married the love of his life, Alice Anne Jennings. Their lifelong commitment to each other produced four children -- Steve, Tom, Jim and Marlena. As a family we are forever honored by his sacrifice and unwavering devotion.

Leslie Boyle
Army
Leslie
Boyle
DIVISION: Army
Nov 18, 2017 - Jul 3, 2000
BIRTHPLACE: Havre Hill, MT
THEATER OF OPERATION: Pacific
0
0
HONORED BY: His Family and Friends

BIOGRAPHY

Pfc. Leslie Boyle served with the 27th Division where he fought in the battle of Makin and participated in the invasion of Saipan. For service to his country he was awarded the Combat Infantry Badge, Bronze Star (BMS), Purple Heart, Good Conduct medal, American Defense Service medal, Asiatic Pacific Campaign medal (w/two bronze star devices), and WWII Victory medal.

Raymond T. Boyle
Army Air Corps
Raymond
T.
Boyle
DIVISION: Army Air Corps,
8th Air Force
Sep 6, 2023 - Feb 1, 1958
BIRTHPLACE: Oakland, CA
THEATER OF OPERATION: European
SERVED: Mar 9, 1943 -
0
Oct 26, 1945
0
HONORED BY: Family and Friends

BIOGRAPHY

Sargent Raymond Theron Boyle served in the 'Mighty' 8th Air Force. As a trained electrician and munitions worker he participated in over seven air campaigns, including the D-Day invasion of Europe. His primary duties included repairing guns, and loading bombs, ammunitions and film for on-board cameras. While he served in relative safety behind the front lines, he was not removed from the realities of war. Family members indicated the war and his participation in it had greatly affected him. As a member of the ground crews, he was aware of planes that did not return from their mission. Aircraft that did returned required his services. This meant working in fuselages which contained the physical evidence of injuries and deaths sustain by the crew. Undoubtedly, he had some form of personal contact with the men that flew these missions. It is inconceivable that he was not affected by such loss.

In a May 27, 1945 letter home to his parents and younger brother Harry, our Uncle Ray wrote '... just finishing our V-Day celebrations.... Talking about coming home lately its just rumors here and there, but as I finally read in our Army paper, that some of the Eight Air Force (thats me) have already landed in the states. Surely good news.... I'm pulling night C.Q. (command of quarters) tonight. Have only the aircraft to keep me company.... We were suppose to have a parade and personal inspection by the General today but its been raining for a week now and it hasn't stop raining yet, not even for a general. Our work has been flying food to Holland and bringing back allies who were prisoners over there. It seems our job isn't done yet.... Going to close, want to light a fire before its gets dark. Lots of love - Your son Ray'

For service to his country, Sargent Raymond Theron Boyle was awarded the Marksman Medal (Pistol), Air Crew Wings, AirCore Technician Badge (R.C. Turret Mechanic), Good Conduct Medal, American Defense Service medal, European Campaign medal (with two bronze and one silver device) and the WWII Victory medal.

Gerald L. Boyles
Navy
Gerald
L.
Boyles
DIVISION: Navy
Jul 26, 2022 -
BIRTHPLACE: Formoso, KS
THEATER OF OPERATION: Pacific
SERVED: Oct 31, 1942 -
0
Jan 24, 1946
0
HONORED BY: Family of Gerald Boyles

BIOGRAPHY

Gerald L. Boyles grew up as a farm boy in Republic and Jewell Counties, in Kansas. He enlisted in the Navy on October 31, 1942, during WWII, and became a Navy Corpsman serving at the New York Naval Yard, Brooklyn. In 1944, he volunteered for Marine duty and became a pharmacist's mate. They were loaded onto ships and sent to Hawaii to take more training and to await orders. Gerald trained with the 25th Marines, Fourth Division. He shares 'We were loaded on ships and for well over 90 days we Practiced landing and running off the landing crafts, getting ready for battle. Then the practice was put to use when Gerald and others found out they were being sent to a little island called Iwo Jima. Gerald remembers the battle ships shelling the island for several days and nights. He wondered if there was going to be anything left of the island. Then he tells of being loaded from the large ship into a landing craft. Bullets were heard all around him. Some men fell in the water as the craft had not gotten close enough to the land. Along the black beaches there were fence, posts, and large holes, made by the shelling. Bodies of the fallen soldiers were everywhere. Gerald reports that the 3rd, 4th, and 5th Marine Divisions landed in 500 landing crafts in 10 waves onto various beaches that were named after colors. 'The Japanese commander knew a landing of American troops were coming and had hidden 800 cannons in caves and blockhouses. The Marines were met with heavy fire. 'We medics were supposed to work as a team but there were so many wounded lying everywhere that everyone split up and worked as fast as we could.' Gerald was armed with a M1 rifle and a medical bag, but he stated that there were so many wounded, that needed help, the supplies quickly ran out, so they had to use whatever was available to treat the soldiers. 'We patched them up as best we could and then carried them out for further help'. All the time he and the other medics worked under heavy fire. 'You couldn't see where you were going. At first you'd try to duck, but after a while you'd just go on as usual running to where you were needed'. Some soldiers knew they were dying. Gerald remembers one such soldier that he stopped to help saying, 'go ahead and help someone else, the life in me has just about ran out'. 'We tried to carry the wounded out and radio for help but sometimes we just couldn't get any help. It was terrible the soldiers were so brave'. He returned to farm in his home town, married Jacqueline Heskett and had 3 daughters. 'I don't know why or how I survived while I was on Iwo Jima, but I know I'm not a hero, those brave men that gave their lives are the real heroes,' Gerald states.

Owen T. Brennan
Army Air Corps
Owen
T.
Brennan
DIVISION: Army Air Corps,
467 Bomb Grp Heavy, 789 Bomb Sq, 8th AF
Nov 9, 2022 -
BIRTHPLACE: St. Louis, MO
THEATER OF OPERATION: European
SERVED: Dec 29, 1942 -
0
Oct 24, 1945
0
HONORED BY: George J. Green

BIOGRAPHY

Owen T. Brennan was born on 9 Nov 1922 in St. Louis, MO. He graduated from high school the summer of 1942 and apprenticed as a painter. On 29 Dec 1942 he was inducted in the Army at Jefferson Barracks, St. Louis, MO, was assigned to the Army Air Corps, and sent across the Mississippi River to Scott Army Air Base to attend Radio School. Upon completion, he attended Gunnery School in Harlingen, TX. By Nov 1943, he was a radio operator gunner on a B-24 Liberator in Casper, WY training for overseas combat. Within the month, they were informed they would be assigned to a new bomb group being formed, the 467th bomb group commanded by Col. Albert Showers with training at Wendover Army Air Base, UT. In Jan 1944, they were on the way to the European Theater. They picked up a new B-24 bomber in Topeka, KS and named it 'The Royal Flush.' Crossing the Atlantic from Trinidad, South America, to Dakar, Marrakech, Africa and on to Wales, England, they arrived on 9 Mar 1944. After landing in England, they had their B-24 taken from them and took the train to their home base at Rockheath, Norwich, East Anglia, England. Their crew was George Perry, Pilot; Vic Lentz, Co-pilot; Vern Bleck, Bombardier; Homer Dippold, Navigator; Gene Bateman, Engineer; Owen, Radio Operator; Alex Duncan and John Krajny, Waist Gunners; Tom LaGary, Tail Gunner; and Gerry Melton, Ball Turret Gunner. Their bomber, #373 'C' was named Monster. The nose art was a dragon with two machine guns sticking out of its nose. Their mission was 4 hours to and 4 hours back and they lost one bomber. The next mission was to Hamm, where Owen lost a good friend, George Carter from Chicago who was on another bomber. Owen completed 35 missions with each one of different exposures. He was concerned 'how would he react, would he do his job correctly, would he show fear.' Each mission was hours of boredom interrupted by moments of sheer terror! He does not remember what happened on some of his missions, but still remembers the one on the first part of May 1944. It was to the Herman Goering Steel Plant near Brunswick, Germany. Lots of fighters hit them and they lost 15 to 20 bombers that day. As the fighters started their run, he remembers the Pilot, Rod McKay, saying 'Boys, give your hearts to God because Hitler's got your a**.' He remembers one fighter starting his run at them and firing about 1000 yards away. His 20mm shells burst in the air before they reached them. He opened fire at him when he was about 500 yards away and as the distance closed, he thought he was going to ram them. At about 200 yards, he forgot about firing short bursts and fired point blank, holding the trigger down. He knew he hit him as the tracers were bouncing off the armor plate. His guns stopped firing and he passed about 30 feet over the top of the formation. All this time, Owen's knees were shaking. They lost one engine on the way back to base; they had been hit by three 20mm shells and had over 100 holes in their aircraft. They, along with three others could not keep up with the formation. They and one other plane made it back while another had gone down. After completion of his required missions, he was sent to France at the forward airfields as a ground radio operator. Owen returned to the USA on 2 Nov 1944. After 30 days leave, he reported to replacement pool for crewman for the B-29 Bomber at a West Coast Army Air Force Base. The Sergeant Major interviewing him for reassignment was impressed that in the nine months he had served in the European Theater of Operations, he had completed 35 combat missions and served on the ground in France. He said as far as he was concerned that Owen had already done his service in the war and no way was he going to assign him to a B-29 crew. He graciously sent him to a C-54 Logistic crew that was delivering materials to the Islands in the Asiatic Pacific Theater of Operations. He served there until his discharge on 24 Oct 1945 at Truax Fie

Margaret T. Bridgeford
Women's Army Corps (WAC)
Margaret
T.
Bridgeford
DIVISION: Women's Army Corps (WAC),
SHAEF
Apr 12, 1919 -
BIRTHPLACE: Chestnut Hill, PA
THEATER OF OPERATION: European
SERVED: Jan 1, 1943 -
0
Jan 1, 1946
0
HONORED BY: The family of Margaret Bridgeford

BIOGRAPHY

Margaret was the secretary to the Adjutant General, General Lovett, on General Eisenhower's staff.

Donald D. Brin
Army
Donald
D.
Brin
DIVISION: Army,
29th Inf. Div
Apr 4, 1920 -
BIRTHPLACE: Goodland, KS
THEATER OF OPERATION: European
SERVED: Dec 26, 1942 -
0
Sep 27, 1945
0
HONORED BY: Wife, Elaine; Children: Mac, Larry, Ron, Mark, Carol, Pat

BIOGRAPHY

Staff Sergeant Brin landed on the beaches of Normandy on D-Day. He was wounded twice; in Brest, France and St. Lo, France. Donald received a Purple Heart with oak leave cluster; Presidential Citation, Silver Star, and the Middle Eastern Service Medal. He is married to Elaine Brin and they have six children: Mac, Larry, Ron, Mark, Carol, and Pat.

empty

empty e. empty empty

empty

EMPTY
E.
EMPTY
EMPTY

Jan 1, 2000 - Jan 1, 2000
BIRTHPLACE: empty

SOLDIER DETAILS

HIGHEST RANK: empty
DIVISION: empty,
empty
THEATER OF OPERATION: empty
SERVED: Jan 1, 2000 -
DISCHARGED: Jan 1, 2000
BATTLE: empty
MILITARY HONORS: empty
HONORED BY: empty

VIDEOS

empty

BIOGRAPHY

empty
empty

The mission of Ike's Soldiers is to honor Dwight D. Eisenhower's legacy through the personal accounts of the soldiers he led and share them with the world.

Image
Sunset
"Humility must always be the portion of any man who receives acclaim earned in blood of his followers and sacrifices of his friends."
Image
Eisenhower Signature

Guildhall Address, London, June 12, 1945