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A Virtual World War II Honor Roll

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Stories from the Greatest Generation

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A Virtual World War II Honor Roll

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Showing Results 1049 - 1056 of 1085

Oscar E. Whiting
Army
Oscar
E.
Whiting
DIVISION: Army,
56th Army Inf.
Oct 18, 1909 - Mar 29, 1945
BIRTHPLACE: Hillsboro, OH
HIGHEST RANK: Private First Class
SERVED: Jun 9, 1943 -
0
0
HONORED BY: Family & Friends

BIOGRAPHY

PFC Whiting had been overseas for more than a year and in the Armed Forces for two years. He landed in France with the initial invasion forces and is known to have participated in several major campaigns against the Germans. He was with an anti-aircraft outfit driving across German territory.

PFC Whiting was declared missing in action in Germany on March 29, 1945.

KILLED IN ACTION
Virgil H. Whitsitt
Army Air Corps
Virgil
H.
Whitsitt
DIVISION: Army Air Corps,
BAD 2
Jul 6, 1921 -
BIRTHPLACE: Phillipsburg, KS
THEATER OF OPERATION: European
SERVED: Sep 1, 1942 -
0
Aug 1, 1946
0
HONORED BY: Wife, Marilyn; Children: Peggy, Loois
Robert L. Whitworth
Army
Robert
L.
Whitworth
DIVISION: Army,
1187th
May 21, 1925 -
BIRTHPLACE: Abilene, KS
THEATER OF OPERATION: European
SERVED: Mar 12, 1943 -
0
0
HONORED BY: Mike Rohly

BIOGRAPHY

Robert Lee Whitworth. THE 'RUN-AWAY' CONVOY - as World War II winds down in the E.T.O. 2 January 1946 - 7th Army Headquarters - Germany. Orders were issued for me, another LT and fourteen EMs to pick up 128 German prisoners from Camp Heilbronn, travel to an area in Northern Italy, secure 128 American vehicles (salvaged from war in Italy) and drive them (or tow them) back to Manheim. Needless to say it turned into a long nightmare. The 'Volunteer' German prisoners could not drive American trucks and could not speak much English (didn't want to learn). The weather was cold and snowy. Since I was a twenty year old officer - 'in charge', the prisoners weren't anxious to take orders from me. After several days on the site, we finally formed the Convoy and headed back to the American Occupation Zone. Our problems with dead batteries, no Prestone, bad tires, short of gasoline, frozen radiators, etc, were overcome by miracles (another story). The Convoy departed the parking lot on a beautiful sunny morning, at daybreak. Morale was high, even among the German prisoners. (Maybe they knew something that we Americans didn't) As the Convoy moved through the beautiful Italian countryside, into Germany up to the outskirts of Munich, I was enjoying the scenery and looking forward to rendezvousing at the Red Cross Donut Center on the outskirts of Munich. Munich is a large city with lots of streets and alleys. When the lead vehicles reached the designated check-point things looked good. Suddenly, it hit me - no other vehicles were arriving. Finally the other LT and the vehicles with American soldiers arrived - few other vehicles showed. A total of twenty-six formed the remaining Convoy. We had lost 102 trucks and about 100 German prisoners had ESCAPED. They knew the Munich territory and had driven their trucks down alleys, streets, behind big buildings, etc. I reported directly to General Keyes, 7th Army Commander, the following morning, thinking my Army career was over and I would be going back to America. Following a discussion with the General and his staff, it was concluded that there was poor planning on their part. I had not received sufficient guards, proper briefings or German prisoners who were qualified to drive American trucks. The American MPs recovered most of the vehicles but few prisoners - (All German prisoners except SS troops were released six months later). The Lord was watching over my time in Germany. Following the great Convoy screw-up, I was assigned to attend the University of Heidelberg, followed by a choice assignment up in the British Zone of Occupation. I commanded a transient mess halfway between Kassel and Bremerhaven, staffed by fifty German, civilian cooks, ten American staff officers and a unit of forty Polish guards. We fed American soldiers coming from America as replacements for those going home after the war ended - a Great Experience!

Howard A. Wieners
Army
Howard
A.
Wieners
DIVISION: Army,
BRO, 26th Reg, B Co.
Mar 29, 1922 -
BIRTHPLACE: Missouri
HIGHEST RANK: Private First Class
THEATER OF OPERATION: European
SERVED: Dec 1, 1942 -
0
Oct 1, 1945
0
HONORED BY: The family of PFC Wieners
George M. Wilber
Navy
George
M.
Wilber
DIVISION: Navy,
75th Battalion
Feb 22, 1913 - Jun 25, 1991
BIRTHPLACE: Westmoreland, KS
HIGHEST RANK: Chief Machinist's Mate
THEATER OF OPERATION: Pacific
SERVED: Dec 19, 1942 -
0
Oct 18, 1945
0
HONORED BY: Nephew Paul Casey & wife Wanda, Great Niece Linda Hawkins & Husband Tim, Great Nephew Doug Casey

BIOGRAPHY

George quit school at 14 and went to work with road and bridge building crews as a water boy and 'gofer'. Over the next several years he became highly skilled as a bulldozer, grader, crane, dragline and scraper operator. He worked on many construction sites and projects, including the Panama Canal. At the time of Pearl Harbor he was working on the new Army air base by Garden City, Kansas. He joined the Navy Construction Battalion 'Sea Bees'. With his age and experience he enlisted as a Petty Officer First Class. He and his wife Nellie moved their trailer house from Garden City to Wichita, parking it in Nellie's sister's back yard for the duration of the war. Nellie went to work at Boeing as a 'Rosie the Riveter'. George took the train to California for basic training. After a brief leave he shipped out to the South Pacific, Solomon Islands, New Caledonia, etc. for the next three years. He was discharged as a Chief Machinist's Mate and returned to Wichita. He worked on many projects throughout Kansas including the missile sites and the 'Big Ditch' flood control channel. He retired in 1977 after a nearly fatal accident in a scraper rollover at a dam project. He and Nellie traveled and enjoyed life for the next fourteen years. George was proud to be an American, proud to be a Sea Bee veteran, and proud of his Operating Engineer career. He was an important member of the 'Greatest Generation'.

William A. Wiley
Navy
William
A.
Wiley
DIVISION: Navy,
Amphibian
May 7, 1926 -
HIGHEST RANK: Signalman 2nd Class
THEATER OF OPERATION: Pacific
SERVED: Sep 9, 1943 -
0
Apr 15, 1946
0
HONORED BY: Daughter, Diane Wiley Bower

BIOGRAPHY

My father was a senior in high school when he asked his father if he could enlist. His father said, 'Sure, Billy, as soon as you graduate.' That's exactly what he did. He was a signalman 2nd class on LSM 13 that displayed a Black Cat on its bow, drawn by Walt Disney, as a favor to a female in his employ who was dating a sailor on LSM13. He also boasts that his ship was in the Tokyo Bay on September 2, 1945, when the armistice was signed on the USS Missouri.

Alan D. Wilkes
Army
Alan
D.
Wilkes
DIVISION: Army
Apr 8, 1911 -
BIRTHPLACE: San Francisco, CA
THEATER OF OPERATION: European
SERVED: May 14, 1943 -
0
Oct 31, 1945
0
HONORED BY: Grandson LTC Aaron D. Wilkes and family

BIOGRAPHY

Alan Dale Wilkes was born in San Francisco, California on April 8, 1911. After completing his graduate work in journalism, he worked as a photography editor in New York City. He married his love from South Carolina, Lila Lee Castles, prior to shipping out to war. He was inducted into the US Army on May 14, 1943 to serve as a Public Relations writer and was assigned to C Company of the 712th Tank Battalion. He participated in major WWII campaigns to include Ardennes, Central Europe, Normandy, Northern France, and Rhineland. He was awarded the Bronze Star Medal, the European-African-Middle Eastern Service Medal, and the Purple Heart for injuries received in combat on August 15, 1944. PFC Wilkes separated from service at Fort Dix, New Jersey on October 31, 1945. After the war, he continued to live and work in New York City. He and Lila Lee had 2 sons named Robin Dale and Timothy Cres. In 1956 he passed away at age 45 in New York City. His six 'Synex' films of General Eisenhower touring Northern Ireland prior to D-Day are located at the Eisenhower Library.

Thomas E. Williams
Army
Thomas
E.
Williams
DIVISION: Army,
G3 Plans & Operations
Aug 27, 1921 -
BIRTHPLACE: Ladysmith, WI
THEATER OF OPERATION: European
SERVED: Nov 8, 1942 -
0
Jan 3, 1946
0
HONORED BY: Eisenhower Foundation

BIOGRAPHY

After VE Day, I was assigned to the G-5 office of Military Government in Berlin.

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The mission of Ike's Soldiers is to honor Dwight D. Eisenhower's legacy through the personal accounts of the soldiers he led and share them with the world.

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"Humility must always be the portion of any man who receives acclaim earned in blood of his followers and sacrifices of his friends."
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Eisenhower Signature

Guildhall Address, London, June 12, 1945