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Showing Results 1393 - 1400 of 1416

Pearl Witherington
Other
Pearl
Witherington
DIVISION: Other,
Women's Auxiliary Air Force, Special Operations Executive (SOE)
Jun 24, 1914 - Feb 24, 2008
BIRTHPLACE: France
THEATER OF OPERATION: European
SERVED: 1943 -
1
Sep 21, 1944
0
MILITARY HONORS: Commander of the Order of the British Empire Legion of Honour
HONORED BY: The Eisenhower Foundation

BIOGRAPHY

Cecile Pearl Witherington was born and raised in France by British expatriate parents, and was a British subject. Witherington escaped from occupied France with her mother and three sisters in December 1940. The family arrived in London in July 1941 where she found work with the Air Ministry, specifically the Women's Auxiliary Air Force. Determined to fight back against the German occupation of France, and wanting a more active role in the fight, she joined Britain's Special Operations Executive (SOE) on 8 June 1943. In training she emerged as the "best shot" the service had ever seen; however, she never carried a gun during her mission in France. Given the code name "Marie", Witherington was dropped by parachute into occupied France on 22 September 1943, landing near Tendu in Indre Department. There she joined Maurice Southgate, leader of the SOE Stationer Network and Jacqueline Nearne, Southgate's courier, and reunited with her fiancé. Over the next eight months, posing as a cosmetics saleswoman, Witherington also worked as a courier The Stationer network covered a large area in central France and Witherington was effectively homeless, spending nights sleeping on trains as she traveled from one place to another delivering messages and undergoing frequent checks of her (false) identity cards by the Gestapo and French police. In April  of 1944, Nearne was arrested and Southgate in May of 1944, was arrested. Their wireless operator arrested a day later. Witherington escaped being caught. Survival as an SOE agent was often luck. With her cohorts captured, Witherington formed and became leader of a new SOE network, Wrestler, under the new code-name "Pauline", in the Valençay–Issoudun–Châteauroux triangle. She organized the network with the help of her fiancé, Henri Cornioley. Witherington did not attempt to issue orders to the maquis groups directly, but found a willing French colonel to do so. Witherington worked closely with the adjoining SOE Shipwright network, headed by her former colleague Amédée Maingard. Together, their networks caused more than 800 interruptions of railway lines in June 1944 focused on cutting the main railroad line between Paris and Bordeaux. Putting those lines out of operation hindered the German effort to transport men and material to the battle front in Normandy. On the morning of 11 June 1944, German soldiers attacked Witherington at the Les Souches château, her headquarters near the village of Dun-le-Poëlier. Only a few maquis and non-combatants were present when the Germans arrived. Under fire, Witherington hid the tin where she kept a large amount of money and fled to a wheat field where she hid until nightfall. Her fiancé, Henri Cornioley, also hiding in a wheat field, counted 56 truckloads of Germans participating in the operation. According to Witherington, the Germans didn't try to find the hidden maquis and the SOE agents, confining themselves to destroying the weapons they found in the chateau. The attack on Witherington's headquarters was part of a larger operation in which 32 maquis were killed. The attack left Witherington in "a hopeless state—we had nothing left, no weapons and no radio." She bicycled to Saint-Viâtre to meet an SOE operative, Philippe de Vomécourt, nom de guerre "Saint Paul," and radioed London requesting resupply. On 24 June, three planes air-dropped supplies and Witherington was back in operation. The number of maquis in her region quickly ballooned to as many as 3,500 as the Normandy invasion emboldened young men to join the resistance. She and Cornioley divided the maquis into four subsections, each with its leader. SOE in Great Britain supported the maquis groups by parachuting 60 planeloads of arms and material to them. Witherington had long requested a military commander to help her and on 25 July Captain Francois Perdriset arrived to assist in the military operations of the maquis in Witherington's sector. Witherington returned to England in September of 1944 and married Henri Comioley. She was eligible to receive the Military Cross but it was not extended to women at the time. Courtesy of Second World War-Secret Service and Wikipedia.org.

Herman A. Woff
Army
Herman
A.
Woff
DIVISION: Army,
33rd Hospital
Jul 14, 1912 -
BIRTHPLACE: Wakeeny, KS
THEATER OF OPERATION: European
SERVED: Jun 15, 1942 -
0
Nov 28, 1945
0
HONORED BY: VFW Post 1714

BIOGRAPHY

Had 100th birthday at VFP Post 1714 on July 14, 2012.

Harold R. Wolf
Army
Harold
R.
Wolf
DIVISION: Army
SERVED: Apr 13, 1942 -
0
0
HONORED BY: Eisenhower Foundation
Robert L. Wolford
Navy
Robert
L.
Wolford
DIVISION: Navy
Dec 4, 1927 -
BIRTHPLACE: Leroy, KS
THEATER OF OPERATION: Pacific
SERVED: Nov 10, 1945 -
0
Oct 25, 1947
0
HONORED BY: Eisenhower Foundation
Robert Wolverton
Army Air Corps
Robert
Wolverton
DIVISION: Army Air Corps,
3rd Battalion, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne
Jun 30, 2022 - Jun 30, 2022
HIGHEST RANK: Lt. Col.
THEATER OF OPERATION: European
0
0
BATTLE: D-Day
HONORED BY: The Eisenhower Foundation

BIOGRAPHY

Robert Lee "Bull" Wolverton (1914-1944) was the commander of the American 3rd Battalion, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, from 1942 until his death at Saint-Côme-du-Mont, Normandy, on D-Day, June 6, 1944, during World War II. Despite being killed before landing on French soil, Wolverton's legacy endured, particularly on the strength of a prayer spoken to the 750 men in his battalion hours before the D-Day parachute drop behind enemy lines.

"Men, I am not a religious man and I don't know your feelings in this matter, but I am going to ask you to pray with me for the success of the mission before us. And while we pray, let us get on our knees and not look down but up with faces raised to the sky so that we can see God and ask His blessing in what we are about to do: "God almighty, in a few short hours we will be in battle with the enemy. We do not join battle afraid. We do not ask favors or indulgence but ask that, if You will, use us as Your instrument for the right and an aid in returning peace to the world. We do not know or seek what our fate will be. We ask only this, that if die we must, that we die as men would die, without complaining, without pleading and safe in the feeling that we have done our best for what we believed was right. O Lord, protect our loved ones and be near us in the fire ahead and with us now as we pray to you." A few hours after giving this speech, Robert jumped over Normandy and was killed by enemy fire before touching French soil. This true American hero is now resting in peace at the United States Military Academy Post Cemetery, West Point, New York.

"Courtesy of D-Day Historical Center"

KILLED IN ACTION
Clyde L. Wonder
Army
Clyde
L.
Wonder
DIVISION: Army
SERVED: Nov 12, 1942 -
0
0
HONORED BY: Eisenhower Foundation
Clyde E. Wood
Army
Clyde
E.
Wood
DIVISION: Army
Mar 7, 1918 - Apr 9, 2005
BIRTHPLACE: Solomon, KS
THEATER OF OPERATION: Pacific
SERVED: Feb 14, 1942 -
0
Dec 15, 1945
0
HONORED BY: Harvey Wood, Jr, Charles Wood, Raymond Wood, Betty Butler, Elsie Napier, & Ruth Bernard

BIOGRAPHY

Clyde Earl Wood was born at Solomon, Kansas on March 7, 1918, the son of Harvey and Amanda Wood. He graduated from the Solomon High School in 1936 and Brown Mackie College in Salina, Kansas. Clyde Wood was drafted into the Army at Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas, on the 14th day of February, 1942. He was there special duty for a month. From Ft. Leavenworth, he was sent to Ft. Warren in Cheyenne, Wyoming where he was in training for 7 weeks. He was then sent to San Francisco, California where he boarded a ship to be sent overseas. It was the 'Americana' which was the United States largest passenger ship which later was renamed the 'Westpoint'. He went 10,000 miles in 15 days - destination Melbourne, Australia. He was sent there to receive troops and work with the Australian government. He was there approximately 1 and 1/2 years and then was sent to Ora Bay in New Guinea where he was Chief Clerk of the Intelligence Department. Serving in New Guinea for about 6 months, he then was suppose to be sent to Manila in the Philippines. At this point, the Colonel of the base asked Clyde to stay in New Guinea and be his Chief Clerk for the island. The Colonel told Clyde if he would stay he would make him a Master Sergeant - which he did. He was there for another year. For those of us not familiar with this part of the world, Clyde said that it is 'down under' the equator, and is hot day and night. Miserably hot - no place for humans to live. He said a lot of our boys got 'jungle rot' and had to be sent back to the States. He remembered eating mostly 'C' or 'E' rations, and having fresh meat or vegetables about once a month when a ship would come to supply them. Having no refrigeration on the island, they had to eat what fresh food they had immediately as it would not 'keep'. The only way to cool off was swimming in the ocean. From New Guinea he was sent to Cebu in the Philippines. It is a small island 10 miles wide and 30 miles long. Cebu was a town on the island with a population of 50,000 people. All of the buildings in the town had been destroyed by U.S. airplanes except for three. The U.S. took the island back from the Japanese. Clyde said, 'I found out the American Division was on the island an Curtis Armour, a cousin, was with this outfit and I got to visit with him.' He left Cebu and was sent to the island of Leyete, also in the Philippines. He served our country in Intelligence for the rest of the war. On November 20, 1945, He was sent back to the United States where he was discharged at Ft. Logan, Colorado on December 15, 1945. He was on the ship coming home for 22 days. Three days the ship and all on it were in a Typhoon. He remembered bouncing around a lot. Clyde was in the Army in the United States for 3 months, and 13 days, and overseas for 3 years, 6 months and 20 days. For his service, he received the following awards: Asiatic/Pacific Service Medal, Philippines Liberation Ribbon, World War II Victory Medal, and the Good Conduct Medal.

Bruce F. Woodcock
Army
Bruce
F.
Woodcock
DIVISION: Army,
79th Division
BIRTHPLACE: Medicine Hat, Alberta
THEATER OF OPERATION: European
0
0
HONORED BY: Bruce Fremont Woodcock, Jr.

BIOGRAPHY

My Dad, a naturalized American born in Medicine Hat, Alberta, landed in France D-Day + 10. He was hit by a hand grenade in November, 1944. He was in a hospital in France when I was born December 26, 1944. Returning to Texas, he led a responsible life supporting his wife and two children. His war injury resulted in several back fusions over the years. He died at age 83.

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The mission of Ike's Soldiers is to honor Dwight D. Eisenhower's legacy through the personal accounts of the soldiers he led and share them with the world.

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"Humility must always be the portion of any man who receives acclaim earned in blood of his followers and sacrifices of his friends."
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Guildhall Address, London, June 12, 1945